The Quirks of Being A Writer

By Lunes Lucien


Twain, Hemingway, Nabokov, Dumas, what do all of these famous writers have in common? Besides being genius writers, they all have one secret to how they work (a  secret quirk if you will).. From laying down in bed to write to using a color-coding system or having index cards handy when waiting for that stroke of genius, each author finds creative juice through these processes. Take a look at some of the eccentric habits these authors had that may just help you and your writing process.


1: Lying Down

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Mark Twain in bed


For some writers, lying down seems to jump start their creative juices while also helping them focus on writing. They find inspiration and the right words to start writing while laying down in their own beds. Mark Twain, Woody Allen, Edith Wharton, are just some of the many famous authors who do indulge in this comfy quirk. It seems that these individuals were known for churning out page after page when a sofa or bed was involved.

 2: Standing Up

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Hemingway standing up

 Writing standing up is also not very common, specifically among critically acclaimed authors: writers like Hemingway, Dickens, Roth find themselves standing over their choice of writing because it channels their ability to imagine new possibilities. These great thinkers have been inspired to create their finest pieces while standing at a desk. This works really well with writers who are health-conscious because it’s proven to have health benefits.


3: Writing with index cards

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Vladimir Nabokov writing a draft on index cards.


Nabokov, author of Lolita, Ada, and Pale Fire etc., had a very peculiar way of writing his ideas. He composed all his work on index cards, which he kept in slim boxes; this method let him write scenes so they wouldn’t be in sequence and put the cards in any order he liked. He also stored index cards underneath his pillow. This way if an idea popped up in his head while he was in bed, he could write it down instantly. Using index cards can be a different way to knock some fun ideas loose.


4: Using a color-coded system

French author Alexandre Dumas wrote Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo used a color coding system of writing. This genius was actually very precise on the palettes of colors for his works. For decades, Dumas used different colors to show his type of writing: Blue was for his fiction, pink for his nonfiction, or yellow for his articles and poetry. Maybe colors are the new way to think not only about genre, but to develop an organizing methodology for your novel?


 5: Hanging upside down

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Dan Brown

Hanging upside down is the cure for writer’s block; at least that is what famous writer Dan Brown believes. Apparently, hanging upside down helps him concentrate and relax better for his writing. The more he does this gravity bending quirk, the more he feels inspired and at peace to write. The Da Vinci Code writer also has his fair share of good luck charms as well. The hourglass on his desk  gets set every hour so Brown does some stretches, push-ups or sit-ups and allows his brain a break from his manuscript. Why not give it a try?

6: Writing without clothes

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Victor Hugo

Have a deadline? Write naked; at least that’s what author Victor Hugo did when he had a deadline. While writing The Hunchback of Notre Dame, he told his valet to take all of his clothes so he wouldn’t be able to leave his house. Even during the coldest days and nights, the author only wrapped himself in a blanket while he penned his imaginations to story.

No matter how extreme or comfy the quirk, it’s obvious that writers use them to break the monotony of sitting at the desk for hours on end. It seems that writers will do anything to meet their goal. And while some of these methods might sound peculiar, hey, whos’s to judge. Get weird with it, as long as you’re writing.

Why We Really Became Creative Writers

By Kayla Dale

I’ve had the privilege of following many talented students through years-worth of creative writing classes, and have not only created friendships, but also watched their voices blossom as writers.  I’ve read their fiction, but I have never had the opportunity to ask them the big question: “Why are you here at Purchase pursuing the Creative Writing BA?”  I applied to this program with the desire to share my personal experiences with others through fiction, adopting my own experimental writing style and unique voice that reflect the way my mind works.  I wanted to know what personal circumstances have provoked my fellow students to write, and never stop writing.   I interviewed three upperclassmen of different gender and background about why they applied to the Creative Writing Program at Purchase College.  Please note that the first two contributors, Kukuwa and Michael, are Creative Writing majors.  The third contributor, Aren, is a non-major who has, with instructor approval, designed their own curriculum and was able to take classes in the Creative Writing Program.  All of their answers are below.


Kukuwa Ashun, Senior:

“My love for writing stemmed from my love for books.  I used to collect so many books at a young age.  I found myself immersed in those monthly Scholastic book orders they gave us in elementary school.  Having this connection with stories at a young age encouraged me to write my own narratives and share them with other people around me.  This kind of mentality was one that my family continuously supported, and with their help, I knew I wanted to pursue my BA here at Purchase.  Participating in workshops, taking literature classes, attending readings by visiting authors, and discovering more about myself as a writer, made me not regret my decision to follow this trajectory.  I will forever be thankful for my years here.”


Michael Chamak, Senior:

“I’ve always liked the idea of entertaining people, especially through storytelling.  I feel like any time I can entertain someone or make them feel good is an accomplishment of which to be proud.  Throughout high school and the beginning of college I was focused on TV and film production.  As I went on, I was drawn more and more to the writing side of production.  I found that I enjoyed writing the stories much more than I enjoyed working on a set, which consists mostly of waiting, and exhausting repetition.  I’m drawn to creative writing because I prefer to tell the stories that I want to without the confines of reality. If I wanted to, I could write a story about dragon-riding aliens without having to worry about budgetary restrictions.”


Aren Landau, Senior:

“Ever since I can remember, I’ve been a storyteller.  That is, I’ve always known I had something to say.  When I started college, I was a BA in the Art Conservatory because I’d had many mentors who encouraged me to pursue art as a profession. The art program was excellent, but it wasn’t fulfilling my need for storytelling in the way I had hoped. Then I stumbled blindly into an intro creative writing class.  From there, creative writing evolved from a pastime, to a passion, to a career trajectory, and I have never been happier.  As a young teen fresh out of the closet, I felt there were never enough good books with lesbian protagonists. Malinda Lo was a huge inspiration to me in that regard, because she was the first author I read who combined the genre I wanted to write in(fantasy/sci-fi) with the kind of people I wanted to write about.”