Survivors to Superheroes: Reclaiming Your Story and Voice After Sexual Violence

By Julia Tortorello-Allen As a teenager, I lived through multiple violent sexual assaults. Afterwards, there was a long period of time where I was unable to cope with the trauma and grief. Exploring my emotions, my needs, and letting others in was an impossibility. Over time, I sought help from my parents and realized that … Continue reading Survivors to Superheroes: Reclaiming Your Story and Voice After Sexual Violence

Beauty in Craft

By Shannon DeNatale How would you define a beautiful poetic moment? Does it have identifiable qualities? When I read poetry, I trust the writer as I engage in the language, on the language’s terms. This trust in the language, devotedly, is the space where beauty has a chance to emerge. As the writer leads me … Continue reading Beauty in Craft

What’s Your Twitch?

By Jasmine Ferrufino Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram have been among the most long-standing social media platforms for artists to communicate with their audience. These platforms have set the bar for newer platforms. During Covid-19, I think humanity realized the importance of online communities when face-to-face interactions became impossible. Artists have moved towards live streaming to … Continue reading What’s Your Twitch?

The Emulation Game

By Lianna Lazaros In a creative writing workshop, we are encouraged to imitate other writers. Take this traditional poetic form and try it yourself. Read this author and draw inspiration from their use of syntax. The first time I found myself imitating another poet’s style was last year in Poetry Writing I. I spent months … Continue reading The Emulation Game

Beyond and Between “Cute”: Review of the Film, Mignonnes

By Grace Mahony Maïmouna Doucouré’s movie, Mignonnes (translated into English as Cuties) addresses how vulnerable young girls are on social media. The protagonist is Amy, an 11-year-old Senegalese-Muslim immigrant girl in Paris, trying to find her path between her Muslim family’s traditional values of femininity and the hypersexualized culture of contemporary society. Amy acts like … Continue reading Beyond and Between “Cute”: Review of the Film, Mignonnes

Culture Calling – Diversity Readers and Where to Find Them

By Synovia Roberts As the world gets more outwardly diverse, storytellers—whether it be fiction writers, screenwriters, or visual artists—are rushing to embody that diversity in their work. The influx of representation both solves and creates a problem via the accuracy of said representation. You see, diversifying one’s work requires one to explore cultures/identities that are … Continue reading Culture Calling – Diversity Readers and Where to Find Them

Does Content Matter?

By Amy Middleton What convinces a reader to pick up a book? As writers, we are told that the opening line, in particular, is meant to pull them in and hopefully convince them to stay for a while. Being that it is the first thing any reader would read, it seems obvious that the opening … Continue reading Does Content Matter?

Writing as Medicine

By Ingrid Kildiss Its 3:30 pm, I’m sitting in class and my mind is racing. There are at least two more hours until my professor lets us out of class, but I can’t sit still. I’m anxious about the argument I got into with my mom this weekend, all the work I need to do, … Continue reading Writing as Medicine

Writing People We Know

By Elana Marcus In the 2015 Noah Baumbach film, Mistress America, college freshman Tracy meets her stepsister, Brooke, for the first time. Inspired by Brooke’s eccentric personality, Tracy writes a short story about her to submit to the school literary journal. After Brooke discovers the story, she is enraged. A whole interrogation scene follows where … Continue reading Writing People We Know

A Celebration and a Weight to Bear: Exploring Violence, Loss, and Culture in Tarfia Faizullah’s Registers of Illuminated Villages

By Mitchell Angelo  Tarfia Faizullah is a Bengali-American award-winning poet. Her second collection of poetry, Registers of Illuminated Villages, examines violence: both personal and societal. She utilizes the confessional style to present the reader with real life challenges she has faced. Faizullah blends the philosophical with the tangible. Her work makes the reader ask questions … Continue reading A Celebration and a Weight to Bear: Exploring Violence, Loss, and Culture in Tarfia Faizullah’s Registers of Illuminated Villages

Every Game is a Workshop: Becoming a Better Writer By Playing Dungeons and Dragons

By Mina Guadalupe Whether they are making maps or building combats, millions of people around the world have used Dungeons and Dragons as a creative outlet. With time, the fantasy role-playing game only seems to be getting more popular. As a D&D fan myself, I find that the skills I develop—both as a player and … Continue reading Every Game is a Workshop: Becoming a Better Writer By Playing Dungeons and Dragons

A Cozier Alternative to the Classroom (An Interview with Paloma Gratereaux)

An Interview by Carly Sorenson  Paloma Gratereaux is a junior double-major at SUNY Purchase and recent founder of the African American Women Writers Book Club. The club meets biweekly on Mondays at 6:30 p.m. in the Multicultural Center. Shortly after the club’s first meeting, the two of us sat down for a conversation about representation, … Continue reading A Cozier Alternative to the Classroom (An Interview with Paloma Gratereaux)

Defying Genre (and Gender): How Camp is More Serious Than It Looks

By Muse McCormack I’m currently in an amazing class called LGBTQ Theater and Performance History where we’ve been reading plays about feminism, queerness, and genderfluidity. Many of these plays use camp or exaggeration, especially of gender, to comment on gender and feminism in America. Camp is a kind of performance or aesthetic that is usually … Continue reading Defying Genre (and Gender): How Camp is More Serious Than It Looks

It Gets Gory: Discussing Bleeding, Healing, and Writing with Students at Purchase

By Emily Hargitai When I was a freshman, a professor told me that writers should wait at least 20 years before attempting to write about personal painful experiences. I believe this is an accurate estimate. Two decades seems like just the right amount of time for existential pain to fully decompose into usable soil. I … Continue reading It Gets Gory: Discussing Bleeding, Healing, and Writing with Students at Purchase

The Joys of Another Art

By Rosa Sugarman Image by Kurt Vonnegut When authors come to SUNY Purchase for a reading, one questions always seems to reappear during the Q&A: What advice would you give to young writers? The answer is always different and often contradictory to other writers’ advice. Some say to treat it like a 9-5; work tirelessly … Continue reading The Joys of Another Art

Claudia Rankine Visits Purchase College

By Kate Brown The day she was awarded the MacArthur “Genius” Grant, poet Claudia Rankine visited the Purchase College campus for her first event, An Evening with Claudia Rankine: A Reading and Conversation, the first of many talks she will give throughout 2016-17 academic year.

Tales from the Creep

By Erik Goetz “A good writer is always a people watcher.” – Judy Blume “The soul should always stand ajar, ready to welcome the ecstatic experience.” – Emily Dickinson

POV: A Literary Choose-Your-Own-Adventure

By Jiaming Tang Trying to decide on a narrative point-of-view can feel like trying to pick a country to vacation in. Just like how vacationers might say: “Japan is beautiful but China is cheaper,” a writer might say: “First-person constructs a colorful narrative experience, but third-person offers a more objective view of the world.”

Talking with Susan Breen

By Jamison Murcott This semester, Italics Mine had the opportunity to sit down and interview author Susan Breen, who’s new mystery series, Maggie Dove, will be digitally released on June 14, 2016. Here’s an excerpt of the interview, which will be published in Italics Mine’s upcoming issue.

The Evolution of The Martian

By Zoe Nathan When people think of books, they think of bookstores, libraries, and even school textbooks. All of these books went through different publishing houses and had many people working on them, advertising them, making sure everything was just as it should be before the book made it onto a bookstore shelf to be … Continue reading The Evolution of The Martian

I Don’t Read Aloud: An Excerpted Interview with Lydia Davis

By Kukuwa Ashun and Edyn Getz Purchase College welcomed MacArthur Fellowship Award winner Lydia Davis to campus on Thursday, September 24th. Before hosting a public reading and campus wide Q&A, Professor Okasi’s Editing & Production class had the opportunity to sit down and interview the author. She answered questions about the intimate literary world, her … Continue reading I Don’t Read Aloud: An Excerpted Interview with Lydia Davis

Summer Reading: Slowly & Scarcely

By Christopher Stewart Children all across America thrive in the summer time. It is a three-month break from classes, teachers, cafeterias, but not reading. Year after year American students save their assigned reading till the very last minute and proceed to exchange essays and SparkNote links before the first day of school, resulting in a … Continue reading Summer Reading: Slowly & Scarcely

In Defense of Young Artists

By Carly Fowler Everyone has to start somewhere, yet there is a certain disdain for young creators. We turn our noses up at the first attempts made by anyone still in their twenties or younger. Reviews often read, “Amateurish,” or “Juvenile,” without ever explaining what makes the content deserving of such harsh criticism other than … Continue reading In Defense of Young Artists

Prelude to Bruise

By Whisper Blanchard “If I ever strangled sparrows/it was only because I dreamed/of better songs.” Consider this line as an introduction into the work of Saeed Jones, a young poet who has recently published his debut collection, Prelude to Bruise, which was picked up by Coffee House Press and put on shelves in September of … Continue reading Prelude to Bruise